TRANSCRIPT: Ep. 168 Why You Need an Email List with Teresa Heath-Wareing and Miriam Schulman

THE INSPIRATION PLACE PODCAST

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

You can only post on Instagram 12 times in a year. You would think I had lost my mind. You would literally. 12 times. What on earth is that going to do? 12 posts in an entire year. Well, that’s how many emails you send if you email once a month.

Speaker 2:

It’s the Inspiration Place Podcast with artist Miriam Schulman. Welcome to the Inspiration Place Podcast, an art world insider podcast for artists by an artist where each week we go behind the scenes to uncover the perspiration and inspiration behind the art. And now your host, Miriam Schulman.

Miriam Schulman:

Well, hello, passion maker. This is Miriam Schulman, curator of Inspiration, and you’re listening to episode number 168 of the Inspiration Place podcast. I am so grateful that you’re here. Today, we’re talking all about why you should stop chasing social media followers and work on what will serve you best in the long term to sell more art. So in this episode, you’ll discover why social media is not a business plan, why an email list is critical for your long term success, and easy ways to get started building your list today.

Today’s guest is a leading marketing influencer in the UK, ranked number five in MarketEd.Live’s top 30 marketers that inspire in 2021. She’s the host of the popular weekly podcast Marketing That Converts and founder of Marketing That Converts the Academy where she works with businesses, entrepreneurs, and marketers to help them enhance their digital marketing and social media efforts. She shared her social media and digital marketing strategies on international stages, including World Marketing Summit, INBOUND 2020, these are all like pre-COVID, obviously, 3XE and SocialDay. Please welcome to the Inspiration Place, Teresa Heath-Wareing.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Hello, and thank you so much for having me. I’m so excited to be here.

Miriam Schulman:

Well, this is so much fun. I told Jen Lehner that we met, and she’s like, “Oh yeah, she’s the British Amy Porterfield.”

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

That’s what she calls me. It was so funny. The first time we met, she christened me that. But what was more funny was the next year we went to Social Media Marketing World and someone shouted, “Hey, British Amy Porterfield.” I turned around and it was Jen. And she was like, “Oh my God. You just turned around.” I was like, “Oh my God, this is awful.” Yeah. It’s so funny. So funny.

Miriam Schulman:

That’s hilarious.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Bless her. Bless her.

Miriam Schulman:

Hilarious.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

I’ve never said to Amy that I was christened that. I think I’ll keep that to myself.

Miriam Schulman:

That’s hysterical.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

She’s like, “I don’t think we can be friends anymore, Teresa.” Could you imagine?

Miriam Schulman:

I am such a fan girl.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah. She’s ace.

Miriam Schulman:

She wrote to me, and I was trying to explain somebody that she wrote to me. They were like, “Yeah, you’re on her email list. What are you talking about?” I was like, “No, no, no, no. She wrote to me.” I was like-

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Properly.

Miriam Schulman:

Right. Like I saved the email. My daughter’s making fun of me.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Oh, bless you.

Miriam Schulman:

So I have a funny story before we get started. So yesterday I was getting my podcast files all organized. And I was like, there was nothing in your folder. I was like, I know I recorded it. Did I delete it? What the heck happened? And then it took me a minute before I realized we hadn’t recorded it yet. I was thinking about I was on your podcast.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. That is brilliant.

Miriam Schulman:

But I was like, what the heck? Where is it? I lost it.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

So funny. Having a panic that you’d lost it and we hadn’t even done it. It’s my fear that thing will happen.

Miriam Schulman:

I know.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

It is one of those things. I don’t think if I ever told you. I did once do an interview, and I didn’t hit record. And I got about five, seven minutes in, and I realized and I hit record. And then the interview was so awful anyway. It never went out. I don’t know. I don’t know if I made it awful because I was like, oh my God, I haven’t hit record. But I did kind of come back around to actually we could start at this point type thing. And it’s the only podcast episode that I’ve never put because it was just so awful.

Miriam Schulman:

Okay. So I’m real excited about today’s… I don’t have a really good transition here. I wish I was that girl who could like, with emails, she’s talking about the tuna sandwich and suddenly-

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

And then slides into the-

Miriam Schulman:

Right. And that’s why I’m promoting B-School. It’s like…

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

No, they have very good copywriters. I swear. Someone is naturally very good at that stuff. But I’m the same as you. My podcast, me goes out exactly as you find me. I would love to think that I was slicker, but really I’m not.

Miriam Schulman:

Yeah. I know. Me too. I don’t mean, I know you’re not slick.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah. Yeah, you’re terrible.

Miriam Schulman:

Yeah. You really suck. So Teresa actually has an amazing podcast. I’ve listened to a few of her episodes, and I really like what she has to say about email marketing. And it’s something that I still haven’t converted all of you over. I know that’s true. Because I’m always hearing how do I increase my Instagram following instead? Or how do I sell more art on Instagram? Teresa, I think you have some stats about why we shouldn’t rely on those.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

There’s so many reasons for starters. So the first one is you are marketing on borrowed ground. This does not belong to you. You know, or you may or may not know, that when you post, the people who organically see your stuff is down to like 1 to 3%, if you are lucky, of your followers. That reach is getting harder and harder and harder. Now I’m so careful when I talk about this. Because I think people just like, oh, why are we bothering? What is the point? And there is totally a point in doing it. But the truth is we don’t own that following. It doesn’t belong to us.

And we have a, I always say a great story, it’s not a great story. It’s a terrible story. But one of my old students, she has an Instagram account and she had a membership. She built up a membership. It was an art membership actually. She was teaching parents how to do art with their children. And it was lovely. And her content, could you imagine, like the posts and the videos and the stories. She put so much effort into it and it was great. And she had built up her following to hundreds of thousands. It was a huge Instagram account. And she contacted me and said, “Teresa, my account’s gone. Someone has hacked it and wiped the entire thing.” And they had literally wiped her Instagram. So she’d lost everything.

Miriam Schulman:

It’s so awful.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

And the thing, she’d contacted Instagram. Unless you’re Kylie Jenner or one of the Kardashians, I don’t think for one second they’re going to give you a second thought. Do you know what I mean? So she had lost everything overnight. She’d lost her followers. She’d lost all that content, which you know what it’s like creating content and doing all the stories and all the memories that you put into it.

But more importantly, she lost the connection to her audience. And she had started a list. It wasn’t that she had no list, but her list was nowhere near as big as it could have been and as big compared to the number of people that followed her. Because she was doing her sales through Instagram, because so much of it was happening on the platform. And she literally had to start from scratch. And the few people that were on her list, and I say few, it was obviously thousands compared to the hundreds of thousands that were on her Instagram, she was able to email them saying, “This is what’s happened. I’ve set up a new page. Can you come and follow me?” But all those other Instagram followers, all those other people that connected with her only through that platform, she had lost them.

We have been really lucky. I started marketing like 16, 17 years ago. Social did not exist. It wasn’t even a thought back then. And we are really lucky now as business owners, an artist, that we can put our stuff out there and it doesn’t cost anything, or doesn’t have to cost anything. And we can connect with audience, we can connect with people that want to see our stuff and maybe want to buy our stuff. And we really take advantage of that, which is great. And we should do. However, it’s just one means of getting out there. Like with anything, you should never put all your eggs in one basket. It should always be a mix of things. But for me, the email list is one of the biggest and best assets you’re ever going to have in your business.

Miriam Schulman:

There’s so many things I want to unpack. I’m trying so hard not to do the New York interrupt. You know what I’m saying?

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

You can interrupt me. That’s fine. That’s fine.

Miriam Schulman:

I’m Jewish. So our culture, we were always interrupting each other all the time.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

That’s brilliant.

Miriam Schulman:

And New Yorkers as well. It’s like we got those both things going on. So first of all, there is that tendency, and this happens actually to all of us. I think, Teresa, you and I are probably guilty of this as well. I know I am that I’ve been so dependent on… So what I was going to say is we get dependent on a strategy that works really well. And we think it’s always going to well until it doesn’t. And then ouch. In my past, that was eBay for a long time. I’m a dinosaur in the online world. When I was on eBay, there was no Instagram. There was no Facebook. There was no Twitter, Snap, all those things, TikTok. There was any of it.

The only thing people could do with our computers was shop. And there weren’t very many websites. So eBay was it. So a lot of artists, we would just put our art up, and it would sell like that all the time. And I didn’t build an email list out of all those people. And so when Amazon came around, when Etsy came around, and the strategies we were using wasn’t wasn’t working so well, I was like, damn, why didn’t I start an email list sooner. And that happens over and over again. And just when you think that, no, I’m good. I figured out this Instagram selling thing. And then Instagram and Facebook disappeared one day. It happened.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Like six hours, wasn’t it? It was like six to eight hours. And again, we were all like, what’s happened to the world? How ridiculous that we were all like, we don’t what to do anymore because we’ve lost Instagram on Facebook.

Miriam Schulman:

Right. And it came back, but it may not have. There’s lots of things that could have happened there. Russia finally hacks, or the government shuts it down, or Mark Zuckerberg, whatever, he implodes. You don’t know what’s going to happen.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

No, you don’t. Because it doesn’t belong to you.

Miriam Schulman:

All these things we’re going to be recording before the podcast. This podcast was recorded before Mark Zuckerberg-

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Imploded.

Miriam Schulman:

… imploded, right?

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

And took down Instagram and Facebook. The thing is the truth is you just don’t know. And it could be as simple as someone hacking you and deleting everything. It could be as simple as you breaking a term of condition, and them either pausing your account or taking your account down. And you know what? This happens more than you would ever imagine. How many times-

Miriam Schulman:

I have a client who told me her Instagram account was shut down after she posted a painting of a bird.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Like what.

Miriam Schulman:

And there’s no help desk to contact if you’ve… Nothing.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

So you have to do some kind of automated you’re wrong type thing, and hope to goodness that they look at it and I’ll go, “Oh yeah. Sorry, we’re wrong.” And they’ll put it back up again. But you artists out there, some of the stuff that you could be doing, it might be that it’s a really beautiful picture, but it’s someone with some clothes off. Or it could be things that they just take the wrong way, or they think means something else. For that reason, you don’t want that, you being censored or you don’t want thinking, well, my best art features this, and I can’t put that up. Because you don’t know what they’re going to do with your accounts. So you’re absolutely right. It was a bird. How an earth could that be construed any other way than it was? But they did it.

Miriam Schulman:

They did.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

You just can’t rely on it. And I think you just said something really good as well about you see a strategy that works. And I see this a lot in other people’s… When they see an expert, okay, so the artist following you might see what you are doing and think, oh, that’s the only way I can do it. Or that’s the way I should do it. Because this artist has gone on TikTok and now they’re killing it and selling loads. So I must be on TikTok. Or this artist was awesome on Instagram because they did Reels, and now that must be my strategy. No, that worked for them.

Now I’m not saying it won’t work for you. It might work for you. But just because someone’s art blew up overnight because they did this one thing does not mean that that’s the golden ticket to you then suddenly blowing up overnight. And I think that’s a worry when we see other things, and then we think, oh, we’ve got to go all in on this. So we ignore some of the basic stuff. No one is ever going, “Hey, I blew up because I built my email list.” You know what I mean?

Miriam Schulman:

Well that’s the other thing is that is it’s that very nerdy term, that correlation is not the same thing as causation. Which I don’t know why I’m using that term because I don’t think it means much to most people who are listening. But it’s the whole idea that just because you see they’re doing something and they’re successful, doesn’t mean that’s the reason. It could be something completely different.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Again, this is such a key point. I had someone, one of my members, contacted me going, “Oh my goodness, are you watching this webinar?” There was a webinar on. He knew I would be. I do it because I’m sad and I’ve got nothing better to do. And I just watch webinars and see how people do stuff. And he was like, “Are you watching it?” And he said, “This person,” whose webinar it was, “has just said that they sold all this stuff. They sold like 50 grand’s worth of stuff. And they only have 125 people on their email list.” And I was like, “Yeah?” And he was like, “I don’t need an email list or a big one.”

And I was like, “But they’ve told you nothing else. They’ve not told you whether that person happens to have a huge Facebook group. Or whether that person happens to have a podcast. Whether that person and has a different audience somewhere else, or how much the actual thing was that they sold. Because it could be that what they sell is worth $30,000, and they only had to sell it to like five people. They’re not giving you the whole picture.”

The truth is I wish it was as simple as just saying, actually if you could kill it on Instagram or TikTok, you would be made overnight. But it’s not. It’s a mix of everything. And having those eggs spread around and really investing in the email list, which will always belong to you, I think is absolutely a necessity in running a business.

Miriam Schulman:

There’s one thing you said on your podcast that I’ve been quoting. So on Instagram you had said earlier that only 1% see what you’re posting. And just to put some numbers on that. So I have roughly 20,000 followers on Instagram. So that means less than 200 people are seeing it.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah.

Miriam Schulman:

Okay. Now what you to say is that an email, so my followers, my 20,000, they weren’t given the choice whether or not to consume that post. Instagram made the decision for them. Oh, I’m only going to show it to this 200. And email, I know you get this pushback as well, email, not everybody opens your email.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

No.

Miriam Schulman:

Maybe 20 to 40%. but the difference is, and this is all Teresa, the difference is those people had the choice of whether or not to open it. Instagram didn’t make the choice for them.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah. They decide. They’re their own algorithm. There’s the algorithm on the site that decides whether you are seeing it or not. And it’s powerful. Again, I’ve got this story that isn’t a great story, but it just highlights how powerful it is. I had a friend a while back who we kind of lost touch, and I wasn’t seeing her stuff anymore. And it never really occurred to me I wasn’t seeing her stuff until I saw something of someone else’s and found out she was dying. And I didn’t know. And she’d gone through this huge illness, which she had documented on her social media. But because I hadn’t interacted in some stuff, it just didn’t come up in my feed.

And then once I went and looked at it, and I was like, how on earth could I have not known that this woman was so ill. And a friend from a while back, but still a friend. I didn’t know because it didn’t show me. And that’s the kind of truth. It decides what you see. Whereas when you are looking through your email list, and the other thing that’s interesting is people say to me, “I get scared about how often I email,” there are some people that email me every single day and I still don’t unsubscribe. I decide some days whether I’m interested and want to open the email, but at least I see the subject, and I kind of get an idea of, well, do I want to see this or don’t I? But it’s all my choice. It’s my choice whether I see it. It’s my choice whether I interact with it and read it and look at it and click on the link, and that sort of thing.

And therefore you can kind of control that to a degree. You can control that you put something in front of someone’s face when they need to see it. Again, I don’t know about you, but how many times have you in a launch, or you’ve been doing something. And then that launch is finished, and then suddenly two weeks later, someone comments on that post, and they’re like, “Oh, when’s this?” And you’re like, “Well, that was gone.” Because again, the way the algorithm works is if someone interacts with the post, it puts it back into the feed, or it puts it back up into people’s attentions. So algorithm doesn’t work on time. Obviously the more people interact with it quickly, the more people are likely to see it then.

But again, a great example was I had seen some friend commenting on someone’s post. And I went to her page. I thought, gosh, I haven’t seen you for a long time. And she must have done the same to me because she liked my wedding picture, which was of two, three years previous. And then because she liked it, it obviously got thrown back into people’s feeds, and suddenly all these people started liking my wedding picture, which had been on my profile for years. So that’s the problem with that sort of thing as well. Whereas at least if you put an email in someone’s inbox going, “This is time critical now,” then it’s pretty much effective from that time critical point of view.

Miriam Schulman:

Yeah. All right. So let’s talk about email frequency. Because that’s the other thing I get pushback from the artists that I coach. And they want to send an email once a month or twice a month. And I’m like, “You can send one every week.” And they’ll say, “I don’t want to bother people.”

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Bother them. Oh, I love this question. So what if I turned around to you? So you sat there listening to this, and I say to you now you can only post on Instagram 12 times in a year. You would think I had lost my mind, wouldn’t you? You would literally, 12 times. What on earth is that going to do? 12 posts in an entire year. Well that’s how many emails you send if you email once a month. 12.

Miriam Schulman:

I love that, Teresa. I love that because nobody ever thinks when they post on Instagram that they’re bothering people.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

No they don’t. And the funny thing is some people on social media didn’t opt in to see your stuff. Sometimes you see things because someone else has shared it, or because it just happens to throw up in your feed for whatever reason. However, I’ve opted in. I have actually said, yes, I want to receive your emails. But if you’re only emailing once a month, like I said, 12 emails an entire year. And the other thing is emails aren’t like what they used to be. So again, back in the day when I started marketing, emails were very much on your desktop. They were also often only work. People didn’t have personal emails. That wasn’t really a thing. We didn’t use emails. Now they’re on your phone. They’re another media. They’re another way in which you connect with people or you have conversations or you keep up to date.

So once a month is lost. You are com completely lost. Like I said, the same example as if you only posted once a month. For me, what’s more important is why do I want to open your email? My friend, my very, very dear friend, he owns a gallery. A really nice art gallery. He has some amazing artists in there, and it’s stunning the stuff. Now some of the stuff is absolutely not for me. Some of it is definitely out of my price range. However, I don’t ever mind opening his email because I know I’m going to see something pretty, or I’m going to see what he’s been up to, or he’s going to teach me something that I didn’t know. So it’s more about why do they want to read your email, and what are you going to give them? What other kind of interest, or added value, or education are you going to give them?

Now for you guys, I’d imagine that when I think about the kind of… I’ve got a friend who’s an artist as well. And he has often put up these time lapse videos of him drawing. He’s an amazing portrait, like faces are phenomenal. And in fact, now he’s gone into tattoos, and they are just crazy amazing. But he’ll do these time lapse videos of him drawing. He’ll do befores and afters. And again, I’m not his customer. However, I find it fascinating.

So if you are sending me a email once a week, and that email was like, “Guess what’s this going to be? I’ve just started. What do you think it’s going to be?” Or it was a, “This was my inspiration,” or, “This was the story behind this one.” If you’re telling me stuff that I’m interested in, then I’m going to want to receive your email. And if I don’t and I unsubscribe, that’s fine. They are not going to be a collector of your yours. They are not going to be a fan of yours.

Miriam Schulman:

Well, and sometimes they are though. Because I’ve had friends who’ve collected my art unsubscribe, and they still collect my art. That’s why you can’t make it mean anything. You can’t make it mean that… They just don’t want the email. That’s it.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

They might choose that another method is better for them, or the way you deliver it, or the things you put in it. But like you said, you are absolutely right. You can’t make it mean anything. I used to. And I remember when I first started my email list, I used to check unsubscribes.

Miriam Schulman:

Me too.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

And if I knew them, I’d be like, oh my goodness. Why have they done that? And I’d be heartbroken. Or be like, I need to contact them and find out why they’ve not subscribed anymore. It’s of no interest to me now. If they unsubscribe, they unsubscribe. If they want to opt in later on, they’ll opt in later on. But you’ve just got to show up and you’ve just got to keep showing up regardless whether they are paying much attention or not.

Because one day you are going to email them, and you are going to email them on your once-a-week thing. And it is just going to be the right email on the right day with the right thing. And suddenly brilliant. You’ve just solved this problem for me. I want to buy that piece of art. Or I’ve been waiting for something like this to come along. But if you don’t, and the other thing is often when people email once a month, they shove everything into an email. Literally it’s the longest thing ever. And all that says is you could have done all these other emails as time goes along without having to keep it all for one email. Which if they don’t open that email, you’ve got no hope in hell. At least, if you’ve done an email every week and they open one in three, they’re releasing some of the content. Whereas if you are leaving it for the end of the month and they don’t open that, then you’ve lost your chance.

Miriam Schulman:

And people don’t want newsletters anymore. I mean, that is so 1990s where we would have the different columns and the different sections. And here’s my art class. Here’s my art show. Here’s the print for sale. And it takes a lot of work to put that together, and people don’t really want to read that. It should be like an Instagram post, basically. One image, one message, one call to action.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. I like to say with much affection that people online are a little bit lazy and a little bit stupid. And therefore if you give them 30 things to look at and click on, what do you want me to do? You need to be really obvious telling me what you would like me to do. Like you said, perfect. I send an email three times a week. So I send one on a Monday, Wednesday, and a Friday. Every day that I send one, it has a very specific conversation and it has a very specific call to action. And that call to action isn’t always selling or promoting. In fact, it’s not very often doing that because I have a close and open cart thing so I don’t.

But it might be reply and tell me this. Or it might be, oh, I talked about this, and it just happened to be on the podcast episode so go and click over there. It might be I saw this thing and it’s really cool. Click and have a look there. So you want a call to action. You want them to do something because those clicks are really important. Because the more you can get them to click as you are emailing them normally, I say normally, in a non salesy way, the more likely they are to click when it comes to a sales email.

And again perfect point, let’s say you are doing an art show, or you are selling off old stock, or whatever it is. And suddenly you really want to hit that email list. If you’re only emailing once a month, you’re going to go from emailing me once a month to emailing me five times in a week. I’m going to unsubscribe. Because as long as we understand your expectations, as long as I understand and you tell me when I subscribe and opt in that, “Hey, I’m going to email you once a week. I’m going to share this, this, this, this, this.” Fine. I understand that. If once a week is too much for me, then I’ll unsubscribe. But at least I understand. Whereas when you go into that sales mode, or into that event mode, or into that thing where you want to communicate more, suddenly you are literally like here’s a sweet, here’s a sweet, here’s a sweet. And then suddenly it’s like woosh, like fire hose coming your way. And we won’t like it.

Miriam Schulman:

By the way, I wanted to make sure you knew about my free masterclass, How to Sell More Art Without Being Instafamous. During this free masterclass, you’ll learn why your success isn’t measured by your social media following, how to ditch unnecessary social media platforms, the five P’s of profiting from your art, and inspiring stories of artists who have built a sustainable income from their art. You’ll learn how they did it too and so much more. To choose your showtime, go schulmanart.com/sellmoreart.

So let’s talk about some easy ways people can get started building their email list, or adding to their email list for those who who’ve already drank our Kool-Aid.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

The thing that we need to do, no one is going to wake up one morning and go, I wonder if that person that I don’t really know about, or I met and saw an Instagram once has got an email list. I know I’m going to search them out and go and opt in. No one does that. And I’d love that they did, but they don’t. So we need to give them a reason. People tend to only think about them and what’s in it for them a lot of the time. And that’s fine because we’re all very busy and we’ve got stuff to do. So you do need to give them a reason to opt in. Even if that reason is telling them what you’re going to email them about, or why your email’s different, or what’s funny or cool.

So let’s say if you’ve got collectors of your art and your art is a certain style, you might do an email that every week or once a week or whatever, you share a piece of art that they might like that went for some crazy amount of money, or that’s different or that’s funny. So you could share stuff like that that says… Or if you’re interested in seeing where I’m going to exhibit, I’ll share that with you. So the very least you need to think about why do they need to get on that list? What is it for them? Because I know it’s for us because we ultimately want to build our audience. However, they’re not going to do it if they think it’s just for us to sell to them.

Miriam Schulman:

Yeah. I love that you said that the reason could be as simple as that. Because that’s actually what I tell people, the easiest place to start is to invite them to join so that you could… Well, the way I would put it is you ask them to join so that you can invite them to your next show. It can be as simple as that. And when you do it, and when you come from that energy that you are asking them so that you won’t exclude them in the future. You understand how you should be asking everybody you know because why would you leave out your friends from an invitation like that?

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. And I saw earlier, I’m having a new brand and website done, and I was chatting to my web developer. And we were looking at other people’s websites. And I saw that Jenna Kutcher on her website says, “Should we become pen pals?” I really like that familiarity, that personal side of it. That kind of conversational side. I really like that. Whereas like you said, the word newsletter implies awful. And it implies I’m telling you about me. Which sometimes I do tell people about me. I do say this is what I’ve done this week, or this thing happened to me. But it’s from a learning point of view. Never from a I’m sure you lot are all sat there thinking what’s Teresa done this week? Here we go. We don’t want to know about other people’s news. We want to know things that help us.

So like I said, the very first, the most simplest thing you can do is work out what you give people and why your email is great, and then say, come and join for that reason. And then the other thing that I teach, and we talk about a lot, is lead magnets. And often lead magnets is sometimes better in other scenarios. So when you’re in the kind of education industry, i.e. I teach you what’s in my brain, it’s really easy to do a lead magnet. There are millions of things that everyone can do. Here are the five ways you do this, or here’s the secret path to this, or here’s a checklist of this. So that can be very easy. So often when you are not in that kind of knowledge industry, you can think, well, lead magnets are really hard for me to do.

Miriam Schulman:

Teresa, lead magnet, I don’t think that’s a term that I use a lot on this show. So let’s make sure we define it for those who may not be familiar.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Absolutely. So basically what a lead magnet is is something that you are giving away for free, don’t panic, I’m not talking your art here, that your audience, that a collector would want, that you take their email address for. So as Miriam’s already said, it could be as simple as you want to know when my next exhibit, show, whatever is, get on the list. Your collector might want to know that. Normally, like I said, in a knowledge industry, in a kind of education space, it’s super easy because you are just giving them some free education. People find it a bit more difficult when it’s in a product space. And I can imagine some of you out there might be start thinking, well, how does this work for me? I don’t want you to completely dismiss the education piece. I don’t want you to dismiss, okay, I can’t do an education piece because I sell a product or I sell my art.

For instance, the gallery owner, he did a lead magnet that talked about five ways to be confident when buying art, or kind of some of the myths about buying art that maybe a complete novice here might think, well, every art goes up in price and that sort of thing. So you can educate me from a kind of roundabout way. If you do bespoke pieces, if you are an artist that will create something for someone, then you might do an education lead magnet that talks about the 10 things that ask your bespoke artist or whatever it is. So don’t dismiss that. But then other things can be things like, and I know some of you might be like I don’t think so, but things like competitions can work really well. Now you might want to decide what that competition looks like. It might be that you have some prints that were done, and that you could give as prizes. I’m not suggesting you give them a very expensive piece of art-

Miriam Schulman:

Never. Never.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

… as a prize. But you could do something like some prints.

Miriam Schulman:

Not even a cheap piece of art that’s original. Only prints.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

No, no, nothing original. Or postcards or something like that. So you could do something like that. And a competition is nice because now you’re always going to get some serial competition enterers, but they’ve at least got to like what you’re doing in order to enter the competition.

Miriam Schulman:

Yeah. One of my best giveaways, in fact, it worked a little bit too well, was that I gave a postcard to everyone who gave me my email during a certain amount of time. But those email subscribers, everybody was getting the postcard, but they were very valuable because someone who’s willing to give up, not only their email address, but their mailing address is serious. And the prize that they’re getting really is a four by six image of your art. So it’s something that’s in alignment with what they’re ultimately getting. So you always want to think that what you are offering is going to be something, like you said, either they need to know, like educational space and then they need to know before they purchase your art, or something that gives them a taste before they get your art. So you think about the bakery, how they put out the little sample.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah, exactly.

Miriam Schulman:

How about this, and you might want a piece of cake.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

So that you can try it. Yeah, exactly. And things like offers can work quite well as well. But again, offers in the original art space are not probably something I would suggest you do because you don’t want to devalue yourself. And sometimes a competition or an offer can feel like it’s going to devalue you. It could be that you get them to opt in to have a call or answer an email questionnaire, and that might be a nice one. Like a quiz. People love quizzes, especially when it shows them something about them. So what kind of collector are you? And it could be a fun quiz. It doesn’t even have to be a serious quiz. It could be a kind of, well, you’re a collector that just wants to buy every piece, or you’re a collector that spends months thinking about the piece to get. It could be just a fun personality quiz that someone does.

But basically anything that gets them to give you their email address. And like I said, it kind of has to be good because people often think, and especially in the knowledge space that, well, if I’m giving it for free, I don’t want to give them the good stuff, and they’re not paying for it. So it’s not like they’re investing. But you’re investing in my time. So I’m not going to opt in for something that’s a three hour webinar or a 20 part video series because I’m like I don’t know you yet. I want something really quick and simple.

So again, even things like, how do you know if this is going to go in your room? I’m sure there’s technology where you can upload a picture and superimpose it there, and they could opt in to that. So it’s just basically anything where they have to opt in to get it. But you need to be purposeful. You can’t just think I can put a sign in thing, or a sign up to my newsletter at the bottom of your website, which they normally are. And it’s like they whisper. They’re like, “Oh, by the way, if you happen to see this, you could always sign in.” And it’s like, no, no. You need to make them really, really obvious.

Miriam Schulman:

Yeah. One more idea before we move off of this. One of my clients, Susan Cohen, she had an exhibition at the LA Art Show. What she did is a, you call it a competition, I guess it’s like the British way of saying giveaway. Is that right?

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yes.

Miriam Schulman:

You know, it’s like biscuit and cookie.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yes. It’s very different.

Miriam Schulman:

All right. Okay. By the way, I got into an argument once with somebody who like, “Jim Dale does not read Harry Potter. It’s Stephen…” something, something, whatever his name was. I was like, oh yeah, there’s a different-

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah, Stephen Fry.

Miriam Schulman:

Right. There’s a different reader of the audio books for Harry Potter in England-

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

That’s so funny.

Miriam Schulman:

… than there is in the US. Anyway. So Susan Cohen, her giveaway was that she had everybody enter to win a studio visit.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Lovely.

Miriam Schulman:

Which was super smart because then the winner would come to a studio visit and they’d turn into collectors. And then she’s like I think I need to make more winners because everyone who’s coming through, this has been really successful. But that was a great way that she came up with of building her email list of people.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Again, it could be that they win an afternoon tea with you. That would be a very British thing to do. It could be that they win some of your time, or that, like I said, you do something very small bespoke just for them that no one else could have. Especially if you are a big artist and you have a good following, then they’re going to want to… Could you imagine saying you could have afternoon tea with van Gogh. Do you know what I mean? That’s just crazy. No one could even think of that. So that sort of thing could work really, really well. And those offers, those competitions, that’s a brilliant one. That was a great idea from her.

Miriam Schulman:

Yeah. I love that she did that. Okay. So we’re about to wrap up. And Teresa, I know that you have, speaking of a little freebie, for my listeners…

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

No, this is practicing what you preach, okay? So one of the other things that you could do is when you get interviewed by someone or have something that builds on the conversation. So obviously we’ve talked about emails and list building. And I have a download, which are the five steps of how to start your email list, and the kind of key things you need to go through. So obviously it makes perfect sense for me to show you in action how this looks. So if you want to go to teresaheathwareing.com/startyouremail, then you will find my lead magnet there. I’m very honest. I do this all the time. I’ll go somewhere and go this is me doing this to you right now. This is how you do it. There’s no point trying to pretend otherwise, is there?

Miriam Schulman:

No, you have to practice what you preach too.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Exactly. Exactly.

Miriam Schulman:

Teresaheathwareing.com. Start your-

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Email.

Miriam Schulman:

Start your email. I will have the link to that in all the places where you can find Teresa in my show notes, schulmanart.com/168. So if you’re listening in your podcast app, you just click on the 168. It’ll take you right to my website, and you’ll get all of those. By the way, if you liked what we talked about today, you have to check out my free masterclass, How to Sell More Art and Escape the Social Media Grind. Go to schulmanart.com/sellmoreart. Alrighty Teresa, do you have any last words for my listeners before we call this podcast complete?

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Start today. Don’t overthink it. Just start today. Oh, and one more thing. When you start, email them. Your people don’t know that there’s only five of them on your list. They just know they’re on your list. So don’t wait till you’ve got 500 people to start emailing them. If you start a list, whether you’ve got five people or 50, email them from day one.

Miriam Schulman:

Hallelujah. Thank you for saying that.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

No worries.

Miriam Schulman:

Because I have so many artists who are like, “Yeah, I’m still building it.” It’s like no, then start using it.

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Yeah, it’s not very big. By the time you actually email them, the people who are the list at the very beginning are going to be like-

Miriam Schulman:

Who is she?

Teresa Heath-Wareing:

Who are you? Why did I sign up this thing? Or how did you get my email? Always start from day one. Always.

Miriam Schulman:

All right. This has been brilliant. All right. Thank you everyone for being with me here today. You don’t want to miss our show so make sure you hit that plus sign in the podcast app. If it’s not iTunes, I think it’s a follow button. If you’re feeling extra generous, leave a review since that helps other artists find the show. All right, friend. Thank you so much for being with me here today. I’ll see you same time, same place next week. Stay inspired.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for listening to the Inspiration Place Podcast. Connect with us on Facebook, at Facebook.com/schulmanart, on Instagram @schulmanart, and of course on schulmanart.com.

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