217: No More Boring Art

2022 IP Podcast Flash Briefing Round-Up - Episode 217 - No More Boring Art - rectangle (1)

with host artist Miriam Schulman


.

In this podcast, you will discover…

Should Instagram Get to Censor Art?  

Whether we like it or not, they are.  

Their guidelines explicitly allow for real world art that depicts sexual content. Some artists are being banned completely.  

A good example: The Little Black Gallery in London had their entire account deleted for a congratulatory post that had a silhouette image of a woman.  

Artists need a platform to be seen.  

I ran into an issue when I tried to promote my watercolor class Go Figure. This course will help you paint realistic and natural human figure, and my very non-explicit image was considered too explicit for Instagram.  

Click here for access to my Go Figure class. 

Why Art is Now Boring  

Do you like art that’s interesting, pushing boundaries or boring vanilla art? I know you all want interesting art. So why has art become boring?  

Journalist, Michelle Goldberg wrote about the new book by W. David Marx Status and Culture: How Our Desire for Social Rank Creates Taste, Identity, Art, Fashion, and Constant Change 

Goldberg shares that the book highlights how we use art and fashion to demonstrate our social status, but the author no longer thinks it’s no longer working. Why? Several reasons but one of the biggest is the ability we have to fake our “image” with filters or by photoshopping ourselves next to a private plane.  

For links to this and other great reads check out my book club list.  

Grab my book club reading list here!  

The Dark Side of Matisse 

The Red Studio Exhibit shows the famous Matisse painting of his studio. The exhibit pulls out each piece of art and other things in the room.  

It’s made me aware of a backstory that I didn’t know until now. The nude painting depicted is likely that of Matisse’s daughter who would have been 16 or 17 at the time.  

It makes me see this in a new light. What do you think?  

Join the conversation and let me know what you think on Instagram. 

Big Eyes: The Art of Margaret Keane 

Margaret D. H. Keane (born Peggy Doris Hawkins, September 15, 1927 – June 26, 2022) was an American artist known for her paintings of subjects with big eyes. She mainly painted women, children, or animals in oil or mixed media.  

Her husband was originally credited for her work, but she claimed ownership after they divorced. They had to have a “paint off” in court so she could prove it was her work!  

A resurgence of interest in Margaret Keane’s work followed the release of Tim Burton’s 2014 biopic Big Eyes which I highly recommend.  

If you are struggling to gain recognition for your work, I’ve got you.  

Check out podcast episode 170, Top Insider Publicity Secrets with Senior Media Coach Lynya Floyd 

Art World News Weekend Edition 

It’s been a busy week. We’ve covered censorship on Instagram. Additionally, we found out that art is now boring from author W. David Marx.  

I’m still checking out your comments about the ethics of Matisse’s painting of his daughter.  

Lastly, I loved sharing Margaret Keane’s story about her art, her fight to claim her own work, and why her method of painting eyes came about.  

Until next time, stay inspired.  

Books!

About the host, Miriam Schulman

In case we haven’t met yet, I’m an artist and founder of The Inspiration Place, where I help other artists learn how to profit from their passion or become better artists. Through online classes, business coaching programs, and a top-ranked podcast, I’ve helped thousands of artists around the world develop their skill sets and create more time and freedom to do what they love. My signature coaching program, The Artist Incubator, helps artists go from so-so sales to sold-out collections.

After witnessing 9/11, I abandoned a lucrative hedge fund job to work on my art full time. Since then, my art and story have been featured in major publications including Forbes, What Women Create, The New York Times, Art of Man, Art Journaling magazine as well as featured on NBC’s “Parenthood” and the Amazon series “Hunters” with Al Pacino. My forthcoming book with HarperCollins Leadership, Artpreneur, how to make money from your creativity is scheduled for release on January 31, 2023. When I’m not in the studio, I split my time between New York City and a farmhouse in the country. I’d love to invite you to check out one of my free resources for art lovers (of every passion level) at schulmanart.com/freebies

Subscribe & Review in iTunes

Are you subscribed to my podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode. I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not subscribed there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. Click here to subscribe in iTunes!

Now if you’re feeling extra loving, I would be really grateful if you left me a review over on iTunes, too. Those reviews help other people find my podcast and they’re also fun for me to go in an read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the podcast is. Thank you!

Listener shout out of the week!

My Go-To Art Podcast – Love it!
☆☆☆☆☆
I have been listening to Miriam for a while now, and it has become my go-to art podcast while painting. Always informative, inspirational, and interesting. I recently started right at the beginning and am working my way through. Such amazing stuff. I can’t wait for the book! Thanks so much for sharing your wisdom, Miriam.

~Joolz224

 

Want to discover how to sell more of your art and art classes online?

I have a FREE guide called the “The Artist Profit Plan” to walk you through my framework, including the 5 things you DON'T need to thrive in your art business (and 5 that you do!)

Click here to get instant access: 👉 schulmanart.com/profit

Other ways to enjoy this podcast

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Read the transcript
Join the conversation on Instagram

1 thought on “217: No More Boring Art”

  1. I should think that Instagram doesn’t proactively police violations of their guidelines, but relies on complaints from viewers, so I don’t really blame the platform for being over-cautious.
    Youtube gives users the option of labeling posts as “not suitable for children”, so that the viewer gets a warning or is prompted to confirm that they are over 18, whatever. In other words, the author is required to self-censor. And if it is a violation of rules, at least suspend while it’s being checked out rather than “Bang You’re Dead.
    Miriam’s podcast is a great opportunity to open the conversation. Thanks, Paul

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Welcome!

sidebar-mir

I’m Miriam Schulman, your curator of inspiration.

I inspire art-lovers to reconnect with their creativity, learn new skills and techniques, and profit from their art. Whether you paint simply for the joy of it or you’re serious about selling your work, and you’re ready to stop putting yourself on the back burner...You're in the right place. I've done it and I can inspire YOU how to do it too.

Get the Latest Tutorials for Art Students

Please enter your name.
Please enter a valid email address.
Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.

Recent Posts

Search this blog

Free Watercolor Supply List

FREE ARTIST PROFIT PLAN EBOOK

FREE ART COLLECTORS GUIDE